Dr. Saleem Ali

Dr. Saleem Ali

Blue & Gold Distinguished Professor of Energy and the Environment University of Delaware, USA

Saleem H. Ali is a Blue and Gold Distinguished Professor of Energy and the Environment at the University of Delaware.

Prof. Ali previously served as chair in Sustainable Resource Development and professor of sustainability science and policy at University of Queensland in Australia. He also was a professor of environmental studies at the University of Vermont's Rubenstein School of Natural Resources, and founding director of the Institute for Environmental Diplomacy and Security. He was also formerly on the adjunct faculty of Brown University’s Watson Institute for International Studies and the visiting faculty for the United Nations mandated University for Peace (Costa Rica).

Prof. Ali's primary research interests have been in the causes and consequences of environmental conflicts in the mineral sector, and the process of using ecological factors to promote peace. Some of Prof. Ali’s former research appointments include a visiting fellowship at the Brookings Institution's research center in Doha, Qatar; a Public Policy Fellowship at Griffith University in Brisbane, Australia, a Baker Foundation Research Fellowship at Harvard Business School and a parliamentary internship at the U.K. House of Commons. He has teaching experience in courses on environmental planning, conflict resolution, industrial ecology, research methods and technical writing.

Before embarking on an academic career, Prof. Ali worked as an environmental health and safety professional at General Electric, an Associate at the Boston-based consulting firm Industrial Economics Inc., as well as a consultant for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Health Canada.

Prof. Ali received his doctorate in Environmental Planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), an M.E.S. in environmental law and policy from Yale University, and his Bachelors in Chemistry from Tufts University.

Dr. Ali is a citizen of the United States of America by birth; Pakistan by parental lineage; and Australia by naturalization.

Prof. Ali and colleagues' work "Sustainable minerals and metals for a low-carbon future (Sovacool et al., 2020)" has recently been published in the journal Science. The article can be accessed by clicking on the 


Time and date Venue Topic Speakers

Wednesday 05/02/2020

From 12:00 To 13:00

02/05/2020 12:00 02/05/2020 13:00 Bringing Artisanal Mining Into the Open – What Grounds for Inclusion? Over 10 million individuals mine artisanally or at a small-scale across Africa. In the Central African Republic, artisanal miners contribute approx. $115 million to the economy each year, and in Uganda small-scale miners generate 20x more to GDP than those employed in farming, fishing & forestry.
However, it still remains an unregulated and risky part of Africa’s mining sector with recent fatalities highlighted in the global media and a major cause for concern with large mining operators and investors.
  • Are we experiencing a tidal shift in the status of ASM as an acceptable provenance for responsible minerals and as a legitimate member of the minerals sector?
  • How can ASM be engaged in the pursuit of the UN Sustainable Development Goals and in the fulfilment of the UN Guiding Principles for Business and Human Rights?
  • How are donors, investors, mining companies and governments making progress in lowering the risk of engagement with and support to the ASM sector?
CTICC

CTICC

"Bringing Artisanal Mining Into the Open – What Grounds for Inclusion?"

Dr. Saleem Ali Feriel Zerouki Pamela Fierst-Walsh
Time and date

Wednesday 05/02/2020

From 12:00 To 13:00

02/05/2020 12:00 02/05/2020 13:00 Bringing Artisanal Mining Into the Open – What Grounds for Inclusion? Over 10 million individuals mine artisanally or at a small-scale across Africa. In the Central African Republic, artisanal miners contribute approx. $115 million to the economy each year, and in Uganda small-scale miners generate 20x more to GDP than those employed in farming, fishing & forestry.
However, it still remains an unregulated and risky part of Africa’s mining sector with recent fatalities highlighted in the global media and a major cause for concern with large mining operators and investors.
  • Are we experiencing a tidal shift in the status of ASM as an acceptable provenance for responsible minerals and as a legitimate member of the minerals sector?
  • How can ASM be engaged in the pursuit of the UN Sustainable Development Goals and in the fulfilment of the UN Guiding Principles for Business and Human Rights?
  • How are donors, investors, mining companies and governments making progress in lowering the risk of engagement with and support to the ASM sector?
CTICC
Venue

CTICC

Topic
Speakers