James Nicholson

James Nicholson

Head of Corporate Responsibility Trafigura


Time and date Venue Topic Speakers

Wednesday 11/05/2022

From 11:30 To 12:30

05/11/2022 11:30 05/11/2022 12:30 What is Industry and Government doing to protect and legitimize the millions of artisanal miners who contribute to the metals and minerals economies across Africa?  Inclusive artisanal and small-scale mining: what does this mean in practice? 

It is estimated that the artisanal and small-scale mining sector represents the primary source of employment for almost 45 million people across the world, and the livelihoods of another 134 to 269 million people depend on the supporting industries of the ASM sector. In Rwanda, artisanal miners contribute approximately 2.5% of GDP and in Uganda, it is estimated that inclusion of ASM in the formal economy would mean the country’s GDP would increase by 5%. College graduates in Ghana find it easier to find work in ASM than any other job in the capital Accra.

However, the majority of ASM is informal (80-90%) and some is illegal. Poor or under-regulation, poor enforcement of existing regulation, and high mobility among ASM make good governance and sustainable development of the sector elusive, and make confrontation, accidents, fatalities and other human rights violations all too common. Developments in minerals markets pushing for improved environmental and human rights due diligence – intended to support human rights and environmental protection - create further threat, as buyers move to privilege organised, professional producers, which are a minority amongst ASM. Without concerted support, artisanal miners will remain marginalised and unable to develop. Or does this new wave of market focus on environment and human rights at last give us a window of opportunity for inclusive supply chains and minerals sectors?

1.    Are we experiencing a tidal shift in the status of ASM as an acceptable provenance for responsible minerals and as a legitimate member of the minerals sector?
2.    How can ASM be engaged in the pursuit of the UN Sustainable Development Goals and in the fulfilment of the UN Guiding Principles for Business and Human Rights?
3.    How are donors, investors, mining companies and governments making progress in lowering the risk of engagement with and support to the ASM sector?
4.    What innovations and good news stories exist that we should be drawing inspiration from?
Stage A

Stage A

"What is Industry and Government doing to protect and legitimize the millions of artisanal miners who contribute to the metals and minerals economies across Africa? "

Adam Rolfe Ege Tekinbas James Nicholson Sean Gilbertson Sven Renner
Time and date

Wednesday 11/05/2022

From 11:30 To 12:30

05/11/2022 11:30 05/11/2022 12:30 What is Industry and Government doing to protect and legitimize the millions of artisanal miners who contribute to the metals and minerals economies across Africa?  Inclusive artisanal and small-scale mining: what does this mean in practice? 

It is estimated that the artisanal and small-scale mining sector represents the primary source of employment for almost 45 million people across the world, and the livelihoods of another 134 to 269 million people depend on the supporting industries of the ASM sector. In Rwanda, artisanal miners contribute approximately 2.5% of GDP and in Uganda, it is estimated that inclusion of ASM in the formal economy would mean the country’s GDP would increase by 5%. College graduates in Ghana find it easier to find work in ASM than any other job in the capital Accra.

However, the majority of ASM is informal (80-90%) and some is illegal. Poor or under-regulation, poor enforcement of existing regulation, and high mobility among ASM make good governance and sustainable development of the sector elusive, and make confrontation, accidents, fatalities and other human rights violations all too common. Developments in minerals markets pushing for improved environmental and human rights due diligence – intended to support human rights and environmental protection - create further threat, as buyers move to privilege organised, professional producers, which are a minority amongst ASM. Without concerted support, artisanal miners will remain marginalised and unable to develop. Or does this new wave of market focus on environment and human rights at last give us a window of opportunity for inclusive supply chains and minerals sectors?

1.    Are we experiencing a tidal shift in the status of ASM as an acceptable provenance for responsible minerals and as a legitimate member of the minerals sector?
2.    How can ASM be engaged in the pursuit of the UN Sustainable Development Goals and in the fulfilment of the UN Guiding Principles for Business and Human Rights?
3.    How are donors, investors, mining companies and governments making progress in lowering the risk of engagement with and support to the ASM sector?
4.    What innovations and good news stories exist that we should be drawing inspiration from?
Stage A
Venue

Stage A

Topic
Speakers

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